Archive | Building Muscle

How to Start and Maintain a Weight Training Program

You should begin your weight training program with both short and long-term goals. Identifying goals is an important means of maintaining interest and enthusiasm for weight training. A key point is to establish realistic short-term goals that can be reached in the first several weeks of training. Reaching these goals provides the motivation needed to continue training.

Developing an Individualized Exercise Prescription

The exercise prescription for strength training has three stages: the starter phase, the slow progression phase, and the maintenance phase.

Starter Phase

The primary objective of the starter phase is to build strength gradually without developing undue muscular soreness or injury. This can be accomplished by starting your weight training program slowly beginning with light weights, a high number of repetitions, and only 2 sets per exercise. The recommended frequency of training during this phase is twice per week. The duration of this phase varies from 1 to 3 weeks, depending on your initial strength fitness level. A sedentary person might spend 3 weeks in the starter phase, whereas a relatively well-trained person may only spend 1 to 2 weeks.

Slow Progression Phase

This phase may last 4 to 20 weeks depending on your initial strength level and your long-term strength goal. The transit ion from the starter phase to the slow progression phase involves three changes in the exercise prescription: increasing the frequency of training from 2 to 3 days per week; an increase in the amount of weight lifted and a decrease in the number of repetitions; and an increase in the number of sets performed from 2 to 3 sets.

The objective of the slow progression phase is to gradually increase muscular strength until you reach your desired level. After reaching your strength goal, your long-term objective becomes to maintain this level of strength by entering the maintenance phase of the strength training exercise prescription.

Maintenance Phase

After reaching your strength goals, the problem now becomes, how do I maintain this strength level? The bad news is that maintaining strength will require a lifelong weight training effort. Strength is lost if you do not continue to exercise. The good news is that the effort required to maintain muscular strength is less than the initial effort needed to gain strength. Research has shown that as little as one workout per week is required to maintain strength.

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Isometric Exercises – Charles Atlas and Mahatma Gandhi?

Is there another way to build muscle and become stronger without weight training?

Well yes it’s called — isometric exercises!

And the great news is that you can get fit with isometrics and you don’t have to go to the gym or buy expensive home exercise equipment.

Sounds hard to believe you say… right?

Isometric exercises are essentially muscle contractions that are performed against a fixed or stable resistance. Isometrics was given scientific validation back in 1953, when two German researchers from the Max Planck Institute published a study that showed that individuals who performed isometric exercises had an increase in their strength in excess of 300% (over the control group.)

Dr. Theodore Hettinger and Dr. Eric A. Muller performed tests on frogs to determine the effectiveness of isometric exercise. The results were conclusive — it works!

(This system of training which Joe Weider coined the name of — iso-tension — became very popular in the United States.)

Isometric exercises has been around since the beginning of Chinese martial arts. In fact, most martial arts systems utilize one form or another of isometrics. Many of the old-time strongman utilized isometrics as part of their strength and muscle building programs. One of the most notable was a young man named — Charles Atlas.

Atlas, whose real name was Angela Siciliano teamed up with Harold Roman. Mr. Roman was considered at the time a marketing genius. It was their partnership that propelled the Charles Atlas dynamic tension training program into the history books.

Thousands of individuals clamored for the Charles Atlas is course — which parts of it used isometrics exercises as well as body weight training. One of the most notable Atlas students was Mahatma Gandhi.

Gandhi wrote a letter to Charles Atlas requesting help in utilizing isometric exercises in his training. Atlas did write back recommending a specific diet and exercise program. Unfortunately, Mahatma Gandhi remained as a Charles Atlas referred to him “a bag of bones” but much stronger.

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Tips on How to Increase the Penis Size With a Good Diet – Boost Your Penis Size in Easy Ways

Did you know that subscribing to a good diet will help increase the penis size? This much is true, although there are a couple of things to bear in mind if you are choosing this kind of diet. One: consuming large volumes of these recommended food items will not bring instantaneous results. Miracle products that increase the penis size have yet to be invented, you know.

Two: you still have to combine a good diet with penile and fat burning exercises in order to see positive results. And lastly: most of these food items are geared to help you achieve and sustain a better blood circulation, which means that you are bound to see the results when you are in your erect or semi-erect state.

Saying thus, here are some of the best food items you could use to increase the penis size, and some of the ones to avoid.

1. Lean red meat is a good source of male enhancing protein. Protein is the building block of muscle and we all know that your tool down there is one large muscle – or at least, it should be. Additionally, several portions of healthy lean red meat everyday can not only increase the penis size but it can help promote longer erections as well. Try to have at least 1 serving of lean red meat per meal for a 3 times a day diet (or 1/4 serving on a 5 to 6 small meals a day diet.) Trimmed choice cuts of beef, lamb or goat meat are always the best options.

2. Another good source of protein is fish, particularly large game fish like mackerel, marlin and tuna. These have exceptionally high levels of essentially fatty acids like omega 3 which lowers bad cholesterol while increasing the volumes of good cholesterol in the system. Eating 2 portions of fish per week can increase the penis size by preventing plaque from building up in the heart’s arteries and thereby promoting better blood circulation during erection.

You can get the same benefits from trout and sardines.

3. All manner of processed food items should be removed or at least limited from your diet. Processed food and drinks are notorious for having large volumes of artificial flavors, extenders, preservatives, salt and sweetening agents — all of which promote weight gain and poor blood circulation. These would only hinder your goals of enhancing yourself and are also very likely to cause erectile dysfunction as well.

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Perfect Pushups For Women

Pushups are the best exercise for women to define their muscles. Why? adding pushups to your workout not only hardens your chest but it will give you great muscle definition in your shoulders, triceps, deltoids, as well as traps. You will get that sexy definition you’ve always wanted, looking better and feeling great. Trust me women, men love your arms, you need to get muscle definition to gain more attraction toward yourself.

Pushups are the best and safest way to build your upper body and back. You need to do pushups reason being you can do this every single day without injury. From handicap pushups to incline, the advancement in pushups is up to how in shape you are and can handle. Excess pushups won’t give you bulky, ugly male muscle in-fact, you’re going to look way better than you ever though you could by increasing the reps with your pushup routine.

You will shred off calories and even give yourself an extra boost. When you do pushups in the gym, men are attracted to the hardness of your workout routine and you will see more men starring in awe when you do pushups and you have a nice physique.

Beginner pushups are for anyone starting out, you simply make your arms squared to your shoulders and your feet together. Start by going down and pause for 1 second than you want to go back up and repeat 12 times.

Handicapped pushups are usually for out of shape, obese women and you simply use your knees instead of your feet, keep your hands squared to your shoulders and you go down, pause for 1 second, go back up and repeat.

Decline pushups are more advanced pushups, for women who are in decent shape and want a tougher course of a workout routine. You find a chair or bench chair, put your feet up together and you slowly go down, hold your position for 1 second and come back up repeating this 12 times in 5 sets.

Incline pushups are the opposite, you simply find a chair or bench chair and you put your hands on top of it and your feet on the ground. You go down slowly and back up, make sure you hold your down position for 1 second.

Advanced stability pushups is where you use a medicine ball, put your hands down on top of it as the ball will support your weight, keeping your feet on the ground. When you are 2 inches from the ground hold your position for 1 second and raise back up slowly repeating this 12 times.

You should pick which type you are most comfortable with, after you do this everyday and you start gaining resistance to the workout, you can increase your reps or difficulty. Your getting stronger if you can’t feel pain after the workout, it’s time for you to upgrade your pushup routine and go for a more advance workout.

Stick to pushups everyday you will start to see the desired results you’ve always wanted. Your going to look great and feel go when you are dedicated to doing pushups.

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Strength Training – How To Build Strength

Everyone has different health and fitness goals.

Some want to build muscle. Some want to lose stubborn belly fat. Some want to run better. Some just want to improve in their sport.

Well guess what?

Strength training can help you accomplish all of these goals.

The popular notion of strength is someone who can lift prodigious weights. But there is no singular definition of strength because it is specific to what the person wants to achieve.

But the purpose of a strength training program remains the same: to help you progress and improve by increasing your capacity to accommodate greater resistance.

A successful strength training program must be built on a solid foundation.

For a foundation to remain strong it must be supported by 4 sturdy and tested pillars:

1. Progressive Resistance

2. Progressive Overload

3. Nutrition

4. Rest And Recovery

Progressive Resistance is the underlying principle of building strength. If you want to get stronger, you must periodically increase the amount of resistance applied to your muscle.

What if you have reached your limit?

If your progress has stalled or you have reached a plateau then we transition to Progressive Overload. This is the principle which requires you to overcome strength plateaus by increasing the amount of resistance at specific sticking points or weak areas.

A good example would be sprinters who use a weighted sled or resistance bands to improve their starting time off the blocks. Basketball players use Plyometrics to improve their second jump.

The value of a good nutrition program can never be over-stated. Food provides the calories to fuel your workouts and the macronutrients to jump-start the recovery process. But you have to know what foods to eat and when.

Finally, you will not get stronger if your body will not have enough time to rebuild damaged muscle tissue.

If your workouts stimulate fibres to build bigger and stronger muscles, rest and recovery creates the environment that enhances strength and induces muscle growth.

A strength training program is an effective way to achieve overall health and fitness. It will help you build muscle, burn fat, improve strength and develop great conditioning.

Before you embark on a strength training program, either visit popular exercise websites or engage a personal trainer to help you through the first 2-3 months of training as it’s essential that you use correct technique to avoid injury during your strength training program.

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3 Muscle Building Secrets You Probably Don’t Know Yet

What makes a secret so valuable is that it’s not readily available to everyone. However, when they empower us, we have knowledge that can improve our lives. This is also true in terms of muscle building secrets. Here are some of the most effective ones.

1. Muscle magazines are often owned by supplement-selling companies.

In fact, such companies own (or have owned) all of the major bodybuilding magazines. Oftentimes they keep the best muscle building secrets from you, and instead are basically trying to push their products. In fact, many of the so-called supplements on the market are nothing more than diet pills-but that’s another story. You should not expect bodybuilding magazines to provide you with the best tips-otherwise you could join their elite group of weightlifters.

2. There’s no miracle weightlifting product.

We’re often bombarded with ads claiming that a particular pill, powder, or fluid is THE product for achieving a chiseled physique. However, it’s important to realize that ones giving the product rave reviews tend to be the ones selling them! Sure, these products can help to enhance your workout routine. However, don’t expect top weightlifting advice from the manufacturers of such products, or their bodybuilding magazines.

3. Training like an average Joe is the best approach.

We often hear the bodybuilding universe argue that we should train like a bodybuilder in order to become one. The argument has no merit. Yes, many of us are interested in losing weight and boosting the mass of our muscles. However, most of us do not intend to become professional bodybuilders. Neither are our bodies prepared for the rigors that bodybuilders undergo daily. Thus, such routines could absolutely devastate our bodies, resulting injuries, illnesses, and so on.

Of course, there are more muscle building secrets that can help you hulk up in no time at all! So, start looking for a reliable resource you can use today. Your muscles will thank you for it!

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3 Muscle Building Secrets You Probably Don’t Know Yet

What makes a secret so valuable is that it’s not readily available to everyone. However, when they empower us, we have knowledge that can improve our lives. This is also true in terms of muscle building secrets. Here are some of the most effective ones.

1. Muscle magazines are often owned by supplement-selling companies.

In fact, such companies own (or have owned) all of the major bodybuilding magazines. Oftentimes they keep the best muscle building secrets from you, and instead are basically trying to push their products. In fact, many of the so-called supplements on the market are nothing more than diet pills-but that’s another story. You should not expect bodybuilding magazines to provide you with the best tips-otherwise you could join their elite group of weightlifters.

2. There’s no miracle weightlifting product.

We’re often bombarded with ads claiming that a particular pill, powder, or fluid is THE product for achieving a chiseled physique. However, it’s important to realize that ones giving the product rave reviews tend to be the ones selling them! Sure, these products can help to enhance your workout routine. However, don’t expect top weightlifting advice from the manufacturers of such products, or their bodybuilding magazines.

3. Training like an average Joe is the best approach.

We often hear the bodybuilding universe argue that we should train like a bodybuilder in order to become one. The argument has no merit. Yes, many of us are interested in losing weight and boosting the mass of our muscles. However, most of us do not intend to become professional bodybuilders. Neither are our bodies prepared for the rigors that bodybuilders undergo daily. Thus, such routines could absolutely devastate our bodies, resulting injuries, illnesses, and so on.

Of course, there are more muscle building secrets that can help you hulk up in no time at all! So, start looking for a reliable resource you can use today. Your muscles will thank you for it!

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3 Different Stages of Muscle Building You Need to Know

Before you jump head long into any muscle building training program you must know the three basic principles of what it takes to garner those big rippling biceps! After you have begun to understand the process of how the body goes through different stages of building muscle only then will you be able to initiate into a long-term muscle building training regiment.

Muscle Stimulation

The first phase is referred to as muscle stimulation. It is within this phase that you will learn how the audio treats its muscles when it comes to adding on lean muscle mass to compensate for previous failures. This may sound a bit contradictory but this is how the body works on a muscle to improve its maximum of elegy to either left or move something of massive weight. The body breaks down the muscle in order to compensate for the over strenuous activities of the weightlifting exercise only days before.

Learn about Nutrition

The second phase is to learn all you can about nutrition and what your body needs to grow big giant muscles. When you have a diet that’s full of fruits and vegetables and good wholesome grains and wheat and vitamins you’ll develop a body that is fit for ‘Schwarzenegger School of Bodybuilding Studs’ in California. If you do not treat your body like a temple that it is and you are trying to work out and negate the nutritional-aspect then the workout will be left unaffected and you will not gain muscles that all the girls at the beach want you to do. As long as you know that you need to eat a healthy, nutritious diet then your workout regimen will be just fine and your body will reward you with muscles upon muscles.

Learn the Golden Rule of Working Out then Resting

Many of the most-novices of muscle builders understand that you have to rest the body. Especially any of the targeted-muscles that you have just worked out the day before in order for them to grow into ‘anything’ bigger. Time and time again well-intentioned sincere young men who want to add muscle mass onto a relatively lean-body structure will forget this golden rule and work out every day religiously.

They do not give their muscles the time needed and required to produce more muscle tissue to make up for the failure of the past. The bottom line is that you should rest every day in between the weekly workout days and a good schedule beyond would look like this: Monday Wednesday Friday workout Tuesday Thursday rest, Saturday and Sunday cardiovascular workout or spend some time with the family. The most dependable factor you will need to learn of these three factors and three different stages of muscle growing experiences will be to be committed to your cause. Those guys and gals that one add-on muscle fiber to their body learn and follow these three phases of any workout regimen and are rewarded with fine tuned and muscular bodies.

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Neuromuscular Physical Therapy – Megan’s Case Study

In studying Megan’s case history and symptoms, key moments and events stand out in her time line of pain and dysfunction. Nine years ago, after the birth of her second child, was the first time that Megan noticed that her left foot was slightly wider and longer than her right foot. The timing of this is relevant as during the course of her pregnancy a hormone called relaxin would have been released into her system to loosen the ligaments of her pelvis in anticipation of childbirth. However, relaxin can also loosen ligaments elsewhere in the body and a longer and wider left foot would indicate the collapse of the main arches of the foot due to ligament laxity. This is one of the turning points in Megan’s history that has had a detrimental effect on her health ever since. The relaxed ligaments may never have fully recovered their full stabilizing strength and when she developed a tired aching sensation in her left medial arch a few years later it was probably as a result of this. A fallen arch will lead to over pronation and this will in turn put the tibialis anterior and possibly tibialis posterior muscles under undue stress as they try to stabilize and counteract over pronation. Stressed or overwhelmed muscles will form trigger points (TPs) within them and for tibialis anterior this can refer pain anteromedially as it passes the retinaculum. TPs in the tibialis posterior will refer pain into the sole/arch of the foot. Over pronation will lead to shortened peroneus longus which will further inhibit the tibialis muscles which will further exacerbate the problem in a continuous vicious circle.

The whiplash injury experienced last year would also add to Megan’s problems and since then she has experienced occasional headaches and neck stiffness. The whiplash injury almost certainly would have affected her sub occipital muscles, sternocleidomastoids (SCM), scalene and other stabilizers of the neck and spine. This whiplash would lead to improper neck movement which in turn would lead to TPs in the SCM and possibly the longus colli on one side (left) possibly due to the leg length discrepancy. TPs here would leave these muscles in a shortened state resulting in rotation of the head to the right hand side. If the longus colli is involved it result in kinetic chain problems and affect the peroneals on the lateral aspect of the lower limb further exacerbating the fallen arch. With the peroneus longus muscles in such an unhealthy state it is possible that it could have an effect on the sacrotuberous ligament of the pelvis and its ability to hold the sacrum in position. Megan states that one day last year she felt a twinge in her right sacroiliac joint while assisting an obese client up from a supine position. She experienced locking/jamming and diffuse soft tissue pain in QLs, multifidis and shooting pain into her hip. The fact that she was locked into torso flexion to the right suggests that the QLs went into spasm on the right side after insult and as we find out later her sacral base is an inch high on the right and there is posterior rotation of the right ilium with resultant postural imbalance whereby 2/3rd of Megan’s weight is pressing down on her right side. This extra load and postural imbalance has led to shooting pain in the trochanteric region and referred pain on the lateral aspect of the thigh due to TPs in the weakened gluteus medius and iliotibial band issues due to the over worked tensor fasciae latae.

With all this pain getting to unbearable levels, Megan turned to prescription drugs, codeine based painkillers, antidepressants, Zoloft, anti inflammatory tablets all of which would have exacerbated her problems through time by building up toxins in her system. She was also whilst under the influence of painkillers probably injuring tissue by doing activities that she would not have done if she had her natural alarm system of pain stopping her. The elastic support belt and the taping would have made the situation worse by encouraging atrophy of supporting muscle tissue.

Megan’s right shoulder is lower than the left possibly due to shortened latissimus dorsi pulling on the humerus and inhibiting upper trapezius and hypertrophy of the pectoralis minor muscle pulling the scapula forward and down.

As we consider Megan’s problems, symptoms, and case history, we can appreciate that she is suffering abject pain and dysfunction up and down her functional kinetic chain. From the pain in the plantar fasciae, spastic peroneus longus, inhibited tibialis, medially rotated tibia, medial knee pain, lateral thigh pain, trochanteric pain, lumbo – sacral pelvic pain and dysfunction, posteriorally rotated right ilium, lower left anterior superior iliac spine, 2/3rd weight imbalance to right hand side, lower back pain with QLs and multifidis in a shortened state, latissimus dorsi, neck extensors and flexors all giving problems we have to ask the question as to which functional kinetic chain we are dealing with. In my opinion, considering all areas involved, it would be the spiral oblique chain.

Megan would have to be informed that her treatment will be extensive and prolonged because some issues have been there for a while and would involve neural retraining for the dysfunction and imbalances present.

  • Medical screening.
  • Case history.
  • Postural assessment.
  • ROM testing / neural testing.
  • All shortened and restricted muscles would have to be relaxed / lengthened with TP therapy, METs, positional release / strain- counterstrain.
  • Inhibited muscles would have to be fired and strengthened with tapotement, METs and strengthening exercises.
  • Any areas of bind would need STR, cross fiber friction etc.
  • A consideration would be referral for PCIs to address the pronating left foot initially with a plan to strengthen that area long term.
  • Megan’s nutrition was not mentioned but I would be referring her to a specialist in that field to ensure that she has no nutritional deficiencies that would hinder the healing process.

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History of Strength and Conditioning Science

Early records of strength training date back to 3600 BC when Chinese emperors made their subjects exercise daily (Webster 1976). During the Chou Dynasty subjects were required to pass weight- lifting tests before entering the military. There is large amount of evidence that indicates weight training was part of life in ancient Greece and India. In fact, the Greeks built numerous sculptures of people lifting stone weights.

Numerous systems of training have been proposed over the years. The accumulation of experience and different philosophies has led us to the current training methods utilized today. Keep in mind; many authorities have varied greatly from the original purpose of strength and conditioning. Hard work and dedication formed the foundation of earlier training methods. Today the opposite has occurred in numerous settings as easy work and quick fixes form the foundation of most people’s regimens.

During the 16th century in Europe books on weight training began to surface. Sir Thomas Elyot’s book on the topic was published in England in 1531. Joachim Camerius, a lecturer at Leipzig University, wrote several books in 1544 recommending that weight training should be a key activity offered in the model school. John Paugh published a book in 1728 titled A Physiological, Theoretic and Practical Treatise on the Utility of Muscular Exercise for Restoring the Power to the limbs, which pointed out the benefits offered by weight training for rehab purposes. In the 1860’s, Archibald Maclaren, devised the first formal system of physical training with dumbbells and barbells for the British Army.

The showmen and strongman entertainers of the 19th Century heavily contributed to methods used today in the fitness and Sports Conditioning industry. From extensive research iron game historian David Webster credits Italian circus and fairground performer, Felice Napoli as the one who popularized strongman performances on an international scale. Disciples of Napoli include Professor Attila (Louis Durlacher) and Eugen Sandow (Frederick Muller). Attila became well known and he attracted some of the world’s most well known physical culturists and many rulers of Europe. His list of students included King George of Greece, King Edward of England, Crown Prince Frederick who became King Haakon of Norway, the six children of King Christian of Denmark, the Queen Mother Alexandra of England, Princess Dagmar (Empress of Russia and mother of Tsar Nicholas), and the Duchess of Cumberland.

At the time training the wealthy was a much respected occupation. We have what we call personal trainers today. The current protocols used by the majority of today’s trainers are a far cry from the original teachings and benefits provided by trainers. The fame and notoriety of trainers of those days was a result of the public displays of extraordinary physical feats. These events were often attended by royalty and were highly acclaimed for their promotion of physical well-being.

Eugen Sandow, born in Koningsberg in East Russia in 1867, was recruited for his teachings by presidents and rulers from around the world. Nine kings and queens and many princes of Europe, as well as US presidents William Taft and Woodrow Wilson endorsed Sandow’s book Life is Movement. Sandow was a successful strongman as well as a promoter of formal fitness and health management. He emphasized that physical education and sport should be an integral part of the school system. He also toured the world lecturing and promoting physical culture as a means of improving the quality of life.

Most authorities recognize Sandow, as one of the most important figures in the history of fitness, with the history of his work revealing that the modern phenomenon of science based fitness training is not a novel invention. Sandow promoted the importance of strength and skill as being the cornerstone of fitness. A half a century later Dr Kenneth Cooper proposed that being fit was primarily dependent on aerobic conditioning. Approximately 25 years later the important role of strength training has once again been recognized by the academia.

In Russia during the same period Vladislav Krayevsky founded the St Petersburg Amateur Weightlifting Society (1885). Many respected scientists, athletes; artists became his students, including famous strongman George Hackenschmidt, who credited Krayevsky for teaching him all he knew. Hackenschmidt mentioned in his book The Way To Live that some of the world’s strongest men of the era, including Sandow were trained using Krayevsky’s system.

Krayevsky’s work and the popularity of his students had a major effect on weightlifting in Russia. Not only was he a renowned teacher, but he also achieved significant numbers in barbell lifts himself. He was the president of the jury at the first world championships in Vienna in 1898.

Krayevsky wrote two of his fundamental works during the period of 1896-1899. The writings were titled The Catechism of Health-Rules for Athletes and The Development of Physical Strength with Kettlebells and without Kettlebells. The Catechism of Health-Rules for Athletes was sent to press December 9th 1899, but was never published and is now preserved in manuscript form. His other book was published in 1900 and reprinted three times (1902, 1909, 1916) after his death (1901).

Krayevsky was well studied on the history of physical culture and all forms of gymnastics. He was knowledgeable about Swedish gymnastics and noted its therapeutic benefits, but his concern with the lack of scientific data of the Swedish system led him to recruit experimentalists to research it.

Many of Krayevsky’s recommendations are still used today. His recommendations include medical control of an athlete’s health, consistent training and varying load patterns, full spectrum physical development, psychological development and avoidance of smoking and alcohol.

The early strength pioneers developed numerous devices in regards to strength training including cable machines, kettlebells, barbells, dumbbells, odd-shaped bars, thick grip bars, weighted boots, isolation machines and various throwing devices. Yet 50 years later there are numerous people who claim to have invented this machinery. In today’s industry there are many systems and people promoting their new systems, which are not really new at all.

The development of different scientific and educational cultures split the West and East as their promotion of physical activity was vaguely different. During the years following the World Wars Russia and Europe still continued to promote various elements of physical strength, power and skill while the West primarily promoted aerobics. Kenneth Cooper’s book Aerobics was popular at the time as well as Swedish endurance exercise research. According to Cooper and the Swedish researchers cardiac and general health depended primarily on prolonged endurance work. Supporters of the endurance doctrine heavily protested strength training. Cooper told the world strength training promoted a beautiful body but did nothing for health.

During the same period that the aerobics craze was running wild in the West Russians and Eastern Europeans accumulated extensive international information on strength and sports training while developing comprehensive educational programs to promote their findings. Most schools offered weightlifting and within a few decades there were approximately 1 million weightlifters in the USSR. Strength training became a key element in all sports training programs in the USSR while the attitude in the West was that weight training would slow athletes down and limit their range of motion. Consequently Russia dominated the Olympic Games, especially in Olympic Weightlifting, at the same time the aerobic doctrine became gospel in the West.

The Russian dominance has often been attributed to the use of anabolic-androgenic drugs, but the sporting use of these drugs was actually introduced in by the West first. It is probably more accurate to say that the Eastern nations dominated due to their special strength science and understanding of comprehensive sports conditioning. On the topic of drug usage no one uses more drugs than Pro bodybuilders, which are predominantly Americans.

In the West today the majority of gyms, trainers, academia and coaches are still ill informed when it comes to fitness and Sports Conditioning. The aerobic endurance crazes still dominates in most cases, yet this makes up a minor portion of fitness. All one needs to do is study the science and abundant evidence that supports the numerous health and fitness benefits of a proper strength-training program to realize its importance.

References

Siff, M.C (2000) Supertraining. Mel Siff.

Copyright 2005 Jamie Hale

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