Archive | February, 2018

Bob Peoples Deadlift Training

For those who don’t know of Bob Peoples, here is some background.

Peoples was born in 1910 in Johnson City, Tennessee and by the age of 9, he developed a passion for weight training. He excited that passion by purchasing the Farmer Burns course and reading “Strength” magazine.

By the time Bob had reached the age of 18 he had become very interested in the deadlift. He did all around training, but his specialty from this time on was the deadlift. He made a weight of 350 and in a year had worked up to 450 at a bodyweight of 165. His first competition of any kind was the 1937 Tennessee State Weightlifting Championships.

The next two years of training brought much improvement. Again he traveled to Chattanooga and lifted in the 1939 State Championships. His total had improved 65 pounds but the highlight of this occasion was a deadlift of 600 pounds.More competitions and higher lifts followed. His crowing moment came in during the great Red Shield Boy’s Club Variety Show of 1949. Peoples, at a bodyweight of 181 pounds, set a then world record (for his weight class) by deadlifting 725.5 pounds.

In 1979, Peoples wrote a book entitled “Developing Physical Strength,” which became an instant classic. Peoples passed away in 1992 at the age of 82.

Some of his top lifts are as follows:

Squat – 530 pounds

Bench Press – 300 pounds (didn’t work on it much)

Deadlift – 725.5 pounds

All drug free….

Here is just one of many routines Peoples liked to do.

Bob Peoples Deadlift Training

Deadlift 1 x 15-20, 1 x 10, 1 x 8, 1 x 6, 6 x 1 (10 sets total)

Squat 5 x 5

Press 5 x 5

Notes: Peoples would workout 4-5 days per week. He liked to lift heavy, so there was no light sets. On the deadlifts, he would up the weight for every set until he reached 90% of max, which he would pound out 6 sets of singles. Peoples would use the same weight on the squat and overhead press for every set. If you want to follow this routine, I suggest doing it 2-3 days per week. As always, get plenty of rest, eat good food and drink lots of water. Remember to lift heavy and with max intensity.

Understand that to be successful in any weight training program – hard work is a must! Half-hearted effort does nothing for you. If you’re new to weight training or grossly out of shape, consult a physician first. End of disclaimer.

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A Mr Universe Workout

Here is a workout from 1959 Mr. Universe champion, Bruce Randall.

Randall liked to work mostly upper body with squats or deadlift being his only lower body exercise. He would change his routines frequently and went through different stages as a powerlifter, Olympic lifter and bodybuilder.

As a matter of fact, Randall went from 415 pounds (as a powerlifter and Olympic lifter) all the way down to 223 pounds as a bodybuilder!

Bruce finished second in the 1958 Mr. Universe and was bound and determined to come back stronger the next year. Of course he did and the rest is history.

Some of Randall’s best lifts were 770 pounds in the deadlift, 680 in the squat, 375 in the overhead press and 482 in the bench press.

Below is a typical workout that Randall followed on his way to the 1959 Mr. Universe crown.

Mr. Universe Workout

Overhead Press 3 x 4-6

Bench Press 3 x 4-6

Incline Bench Press 3 x 4-6

Curls 3 x 4-6

Chins 3 x 4-6

Leg Raises 1 x 20-50

Squats or Deadlifts 3 x 6-8

Notes: Randall trained 3-4 days per week and would alternate squats and deadlifts. He eat three meals a day with one or two homemade protein drinks. As always, train hard and with maximum effort. If 3-4 days is too much, lower it to 2 days. Train hard and heavy.

Understand that to be successful in any weight training program – hard work is a must! Half-hearted effort does nothing for you. If you’re new to weight training or grossly out of shape, consult a physician first. End of disclaimer.

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Hockey Workouts For 12-14 Year Old Players – Off-Ice Training to Help Young Teens Dominate the Ice

Hockey workouts should be something every young teen player looking to make an impact on the ice should be doing, yet very few ever do. Generally speaking, only the kids playing at the very top elite levels will focus on physical training, and even then it’s not as common as it should be. The fact is though, no matter what level a young player is playing at, hockey specific physical training will help them meet their full potential and reach their goals on the ice. Here are some tips to consider for any young teen looking to start an off-ice training program.

Understand the unique needs of young teens:

Young teens bodies aren’t yet quite as developed as the bodies of older teens and adult players. By the time a player is 15 or 16 years old, their bodies are developed enough to do the same workouts as an adult player would. However, prior to that, doing an adult workout can actually hinder their progress and comes with a high risk of injury. The key is to get the young player on a workout program that is specifically tailored to their age group. This offers all the benefits of physical training, with complete safety.

Make sure the workouts are enjoyable for the teen:

Young teens don’t generally have the discipline to stick to a workout routine they don’t find enjoyable simply because they know it will get them results on the ice. Forcing them might also result in burnout or loss of interest, which can kill the love of the game. The key is to make the workouts simple and enjoyable so that the young player doesn’t dread their off-ice training. A great way to do this is to have the player workout along with one or more teammates. This way, their workout is a social experience and they won’t get bored, while also getting all the on-ice benefits that the workouts provide.

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Reg Park’s 1951 Mr. Universe Workout

This is the same workout that Reg Park trained with to win the 1951 Mr. Universe title. He won Mr. Universe again in 1958, becoming the first to win the prestigious event twice. Park, who later went on to replace Steve Reeves as Hercules in the mid sixties, gained 25 pounds of muscle on an already solid frame in 10 months with this program.

Reg trained three days a week on this routine. He ate 3-4 meals per day and had a protein drink that was made up of milk, cream and honey, which he drank six times a day. Proof that you don’t need to buy expensive supplements.

Grab any photo of Reg Park and you’ll see what can be done with hard work and determination. Remember, Park was a pre-steroid bodybuilder, all natural. And to me he looks a lot better and more powerful than the drug induced bodybuilders of today.

The Reg Park Classic 1951 Workout

Squats 5 x 10

Bench Press 5 x 10

Weighted Dips 5 x 12

Barbell Curls 5 x 10

French Presses 5 x 10

Chins 5 x 10

Donkey Raises 5 sets

Abs 5 sets

Notes: There was no rep scheme for his abs and calves, he’d work them until they had enough. Park, like all the old timers, lifted heavy weights and didn’t use many isolation exercises in his routine. If you decide to follow this program and feel wiped out on three days a week, knock it down to two. Park had exceptional genetics and recovery ability that most don’t have.

Understand that to be successful in any weight training program – hard work is a must! Half-hearted effort does nothing for you. If you’re new to weight training or grossly out of shape, consult a physician first and get on a beginners program. End of disclaimer.

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Classical Conditioning: The Secret Behind Exercise Motivation

We all know how hard it can be sometimes to get off the couch and exercise.

Even the least creative of minds can come up with some excuse to avoid going for a run. Procrastination is a huge issue in fitness. But many people don’t realize how easy it can be to motivate yourself to go for a run.

What if you could trick your mind into thinking it actually wanted to exercise?

Using simple psychology, you can turn your mind into your very own personal trainer! For free.

Your mind used to be your biggest barrier to exercise – your body craved a run, but you talked yourself out of it. Now your mind can be your biggest motivator. How?

Classical conditioning.

Step one is to make a plan. Before you can even start to use psychological conditioning, you need to create a tangible workout schedule. Start with small, attainable goals – such as going for a run every other evening for a week.

You need to write your plan out as a list – and put it somewhere you’ll see every day. This constant reminder that you should be exercising is important to the concept of classical conditioning which we will try to implement into your exercise routine.

Next it’s time to apply the psychological phenomenon of classical conditioning.

Classical conditioning is a term given to the psychological effect of stimulus association. Perhaps you’ve heard of Pavlov’s dogs – who came to associate food with the sound of a bell, and eventually salivated merely at the bell. Classical conditioning requires a neutral stimulus to gradually become closely associated with a stimulus which causes some sort of reflex in the subject. Eventually the boundary between the stimuli will become blurred in the mind. The ultimate goal of classical conditioning is to transfer the reflex from the second stimulus to the first (previously neutral) stimulus.

So what’s the neutral stimulus in your exercise plan?

The act of going for a run.

In order to achieve effective motivation through classical conditioning, you need to find a stimulus – which already causes a reaction from you – and begin associating it with the act of exercise.

For example: your favourite song. Go cold turkey on listening to your favourite song – unless you are exercising. Make sure that you do not hear the song at any other time. Look forward to listening to it while you run!

After a while, the same feelings you get NOW when you hear your favourite song will be associated with the act of exercise.

To run will be a treat – whether or not you listen to the song.

Although the stimulus of music is ideal for this sort of conditioning – because it is easy to control, and easy to associate with physical activity – you CAN experiment with other types of stimuli as well!

Maybe you have a favourite shirt that would be appropriate to run in. Maybe you can drink your favourite energy drink on your run.

Keep in mind that stimuli which are associated with physical activity WHILE you are completing the activity are the most effective. The more intense the connection with the actual activity, the more effective the classical conditioning will be. And, ultimately, the more you will love exercising!

Finally, realize that lack of motivation to exercise is something that everyone experiences.

But now you’re one of the few who know the secret to overcoming exercise procrastination.

And you can beat this laziness!

Now get out there and go for a run!

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